Transportation efficiency means more that just cost per passenger mile.

In a letter to the editor in The Des Moines Register, Lauren Lasswell asked, “Why do we support a transportation system that’s incredibly inefficient?”  (See link below to Lasswell’s letter published 8/14/20.)  She advocated for more public mass transit.  She wrote, “…the gas and money saved… would be astounding.”  She does not account for the fact that the vast majority of roads are paid for by fuel taxes and vehicle registration fees, much of which would go away if people moved away from passenger cars to mass transit.  Also not mentioned is that our freely made individual decisions make it clear that most people prefer the convenience and time saved by using their own passenger car to go quickly and directly from any place to another.

Stop auto sales prohibition!

Iowa prohibits auto sales on Sundays!  Aaron Gott’s commentary in The Des Moines Register about the unconstitutional anti-competitive protections given to automobile dealers and others was spot on.  (7/19/2013 “Don’t let laws play favorites”)  I don’t know if Iowa law prohibits automobile manufacturers from selling directly to consumers in Iowa, but if so, that law should be repealed.  I do know that Iowa law still prohibits automobile dealers from being open for business on Sundays. That law only benefits auto dealers, not the citizens of Iowa. Many businesses in Iowa would love to be closed one day a week if the government forced all of their competitors to do the same.   Our legislators need to stand up against the well funded automobile dealers and repeal this anti-consumer, special interest protection law.

Jack Hatch is wrong – auto bailout was not needed to help Iowa manufacturers.

Contrary to the letter by Jack Hatch, the Obama administration and Congress were wrong in the way they handled the auto manufacturer’s bailout.  (See The Des Moines Register, 11/3/2012, “Auto bailout saved many Iowa jobs, too”)  Romney is correct that we should have followed established bankruptcy laws.  The bankruptcy process would have allowed the companies to remain open and the jobs to not be lost.  The companies could have reorganized their debt and equity and emerged from bankruptcy stronger.  What actually happened was that politically favored creditors, such as unions, were given unfair preferences, and some unfavored creditors were cheated out of their lawful security.  It is quite likely that Iowa manufacturers would have continued to supply their parts to the industry even if the law had been properly followed.

Link to Register article: http://www.desmoinesregister.com/article/20121104/OPINION04/311040058/Letter-to-the-editor-Auto-bailout-saved-many-Iowa-jobs-too?Opinion&nclick_check=1